Happy Chinese New Year to you all at aias

February 7, 2016

Happy New Year! ‘as yuer munkee a leecance?

In a message dated 07/02/2016 19:43:22 GMT Standard Time, writes:

The year of the Monkey!
Vivienne

Slides for Frank Acland

February 7, 2016

Hello Steve,
Many thanks for this permission to post. These important slides will be archived permanently on the Wayback Machine.
Myron

Slides for Frank Acland

Hello Myron,

Yes, of course, please post it. Please make sure you have the latest version, and I have attached it here as well.

Let me think about whether adding your comments will add to understanding for the audience Frank has, and that is why we did a much simplified version.

My thought was if we can get people understanding that the boundaries of energy momentum systems are not constrained as in the old thinking, and that ECE provides the link, this will be a major accomplishment. I worked with Horst to make sure I wasn’t saying anything wrong, but am most interested in any improvements.

I will add a point about the scientometrics–that is very important.

Steve

Steve Bannister Stephen C. Bannister, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Economics University of Utah

On 2/7/2016 12:30 AM, EMyrone wrote:

I think that this is an outstanding set of slides by Horst Eckardt and Steve Bannister, do I have permission to post it on the blog? Once posted it will be immediately and permanently archived on www.archive.org, a very important thing. I agree that the work in UFT311 and UFT321 is outstanding, providing perfect agreement with data. I would just like to point out that conservation of energy in the old type of Einsteinian general relativity (torsionless theory) also relies directly on the energy in spacetime. Conservation of energy momentum and charge current density in ECE2 and EC has been proven in many different ways in many papers. This mean conservation of total energy momentum. Energy can be transformed from one form to another, total energy is conserved. The scientometrics show overwhelming acceptance of the ideas of ECE and ECE2 and perhaps a line or two can be used to mention the scientometrics. Only those who know nothing at all about physics would deny these facts.

Sent: 06/02/2016 15:55:35 GMT Standard Time
Subj: Document for Frank Acland

Hello Myron. Horst and I cooperated on this for Frank Acland’s largely non-technical audience. I sent it to Frank and asked him to attribute it to AIAS. I anticipate updating this as appropriate, so if you or anyone in the group has input, I will happilly incorporate.

directElectricity.pdf

Flemings of Midlothian

February 7, 2016

Thanks again, this is impressive research. I would say that DNA testing should be able to settle some aspects of the lineage, comparison of DNA from the Fleming families. Sir Alexander would have approved of that scientific approach. The Y chromosome is passed on from father to son unchanged as you know, so there might be similarities between the two groups of Flemings. These days they might be able to do mixed line DNA testing. I am descended from a Fleming of Scotland in a mixed (i.e. male / female) line over many generations. Originally, “Fleming” must have been a name given to anyone from Flanders, so the name in itself does not indicate a family relation as you infer. My Newlands cousin Vivienne, and her colleague, made great progress in getting back as far as they did, and I am glad that there is agreement up to a point. In my direct Evans line I am descended from generations of farm labourers from the Hay on Wye region, (Y Gelli Gandryll) and I grew up on a smallholding as in my autobiography in the blue box above my coat of arms on the home page of www.aias.us. That direct line goes back to the early eighteenth century, to the marriage of Edward Evans with Elizabeth Gunter (Gaunt d’Or or Golden Gauntlet) of an old Norman family in St. Mary’s Cusop, just inside Hereford county. The name “Evans” was originally ab Ifan (Brythonic Celtic) or mac Ewan (Goidelic Celtic), a name given by the church, from the ancient Greek Ioan or John, or possibly an ancient Celtic warrior name meaning “fearless”. In another line I am descended from Tewdwr Mawr ap Cadell, Brenin Deau Cymru, King of Southern Wales, the Tudor ancestor of Henry VII, my ancestral cousin. The genealogy of Tewdwr Mawr (Tudor or Theodoric the Great) goes back to the Kings of Gododdin, whose capital was Dun Edin (Edinburgh). The name was taken from the Visigoth Roman Emperor Theodoric the Great and transliterated to Tewdwr, or Tudur, which became Tudor. As a fluent Welsh speaker I am able to understand the ancient language of Scotland, Cumbric, with the help of some scholarship online. It is of coruse British Celtic, spoken up to Aberdeen as Caledonian Celtic. All the genealogy is on www.aias.us as you probably know. I was fortunate in obtaining the help of excellent genealogists, notably Stuart Davies, Dewi Lewis, Arthur Turner-Thomas and my cousin Vivienne Swaby. The Comb side of our family goes back to Clan mac Tomaidh (mac Thomas) and Clan mac an Taoiseach (Mackintosh), the leaders of Clan na Chattan. Any male Newlands of relevance in your area could do a DNA test and it might lead back to Norse DNA, from Trondheim in Norway. Similarly the Flemings could group together and collect DNA profiles.

To: EMyrone@aol.com
Sent: 06/02/2016 21:21:41 GMT Standard Time
Subj: Re: Many thanks to William Fleming

The reason that I contacted you was because one of Sir Alexander’s descendants had seen your website and he contacted me to see what I thought about it. The family tree that we have for Sir Alexander goes back to the John Fleming and Janet Fleming as yours does. The difference is from that point. As far as we understand, John was a son of Hugh Fleming in Glengavel and the name Hugh appeared in every generation after that (Sir Alexander was a son of Hugh Fleming). John also had a brother Hugh who remained in Glengavel. The farms of Plewland, Glengavil, Martinholm and Templeland were all neighbouring farms.
The Hawkwood family was a different family in the same parish and they can be traced back to John Fleming who died in Hawkwood in 1658. He was married to Barbara Torrence. The John (that you have as a son of a John born in 1720 and grandson of Walter) was a son of John Fleming and Jean Leiper in Hawkwood and that John was a son of Robert Fleming in Hawkwood. There was a strict naming pattern for children in Scotland. The eldest son was generally named after the paternal grandfather and the second son after the maternal grandfather. The eldest daughter was named after the maternal grandmother and the second daughter named after the paternal grandmother. John Fleming and Jean Leiper named their eldest son Robert after John’s father. The Fleming family were tenants in Hawkwood until just recently (within the last 10 years) when they gave up the tenancy after a period of about 400 years. In all that time they were always tenants.

I have transcribed the entire Avondale Old Parish Registers and this information has all come from them, the Kirk Session Records for the parish, from old gravestones and from members of the families concerned. From the end of the 1600s until 1854 there were about 800 Fleming births recorded in the parish and also a large number of marriages. I believe that the estate records for the Duke of Hamilton who owned many of these farms confirms that the Flemings had been in Hawkwood from the time that I have mentioned and possibly earlier.

I have tried to link the Hawkwood family with Sir Alexander’s family, but have never found any link. Having been involved in farming myself for most of my life I knew a lot of the Flemings from both families. The second last generation of Flemings in Hawkwood had four sons, Robert, William, James and Andrew, and the second son married my cousin. These four names were typical of the family throughout the generations. Another descendant of the Hawkwood family was in the neighbouring farm to us. I am also friendly with Ian Fleming, the son of John Fleming in Kinnox who was descended from Sir Alexander’s family. Like the Hawkwood family they spread out to many other farms.

The family tree that you have starting with George Fleming (b.1540) is one of the Mid Lothian / Edinburgh families. Walter and Christian’s children were born roughly between 1706 and 1720, by which time the Hawkwood family were well established in the area and had spread out to several other farms. There were lots of different Fleming families in the parish and not all of them were involved in farming. A large number of them in Strathaven were weavers and in fact as there were so many of them that part of the town was named Flemingtown (later Flemington) and is still known by that name today.

My reasons for thinking that the Edinburgh family are unconnected are as follows. Firstly the Hawkwood and Sir Alexander’s families were well established in Avondale long before the time that you have made the link. Secondly the forenames of the Edinburgh family of George, Thomas and Walter do not appear in the two Avondale families. Thirdly there was no mention in the Old Parish Records or the Kirk Session records of any members of the Edinburgh family and lastly I think that the Edinburgh family may have been landowners rather than farmers.

I would be interested to hear Vivienne’s case for making the link to the Edinburgh family.

William

—-Original message—-
From : EMyrone@aol.com
Date : 06/02/2016 – 17:46 (GMTST)
To : w.fleming217@btinternet.com, vivswaby@gmail.com
Subject : Many thanks to William Fleming

Many thanks again, I recall that Vivienne sent a message some time ago on the reasoning that led to a possible link with Sir Alexander. This is impressively researched information, and so is the work of Vivienne and her colleague. I should think that more and more material will be archived on the internet soon, so a clue may come up.

Myron

In a message dated 04/02/2016 16:43:50 GMT Standard Time writes:

Looking at the family tree for Sir Alexander Fleming, and regarding his great grandparents, John Fleming and Janet Fleming, they were married in 1768 and their eight known children were James (b.1769), Mary (b.1771), Hugh (b.1773), James (b.1775), John (b.1778), Andrew (b.1780), William (b.1782) and Matthew (b/1784). If John was a grandson of Walter Fleming and Christian Somerville then I would have thought that one of the sons (usually the eldest) would have been named Walter. As John and Janet had only one daughter it is difficult to know if a second daughter would have been named Christian. but in all the succeeding generations no daughter was ever named Christian.
When William Fleming in Plewland died about 1589 there was a hint that he may have originated from Tweeddale in Peeblesshire where a Fleming family had lived from an early period. I have never been able to prove this. The names of Robert, Alexander, John and William all featured in that family which made me think that there really might be a connection there. That family had connections to the nobility Fleming family who originally settled in Lanarkshire and built Boghall Castle at Biggar, the seat of the family for a lengthy time.

The connection with the Peeblesshire Flemings should not be taken as gospel, but it is something that I have often tried to find more evidence for.

If only more records were available it would make the job much easier.

William

Possible Link to Sir Alexander Fleming

Many thanks again! I attach the Comb / Newlands line and line of Sir Alexander Fleming with which you are familiar. These were prepared by Vivienne Swaby and her colleague. I think that a link proven by documents must be established between Christiana Fleming (born 1740 in Blackburn), who married David Comb (born 1729 in Dunbar), and any one of the Flemings of the line of Sir Alexander Fleming. Also attached is the extrapolation of the line of Patrick Comb to Thomaidh Mor, descended from Clan Mac an Taoiseach. Looking for accurate Fleming ancestry must be like looking for accurate Evans ancestry here in Wales.

In a message dated 04/02/2016 09:43:19 GMT Standard Time, writes:

Dear Myron,
Thank you for your reply. The family tree on the website for Sir Alexander Fleming back to John Fleming and his spouse Janet Fleming who were married in 1768 is in total agreement with the tree that I have. However it is the lineage before that where we differ. I believe that the aforementioned John possibly came from the branch of the family who farmed in Glengavel, a neighbouring farm to Plewland and Martinholm. The family names of the Glengavel family were Hugh, John, Andrew, William and Alexander and most of those names were prominent in Sir Alexander’s family. I also found a record of a William Fleming who died in Plewland about 1589. Plewland was the farm that Sir Alexander’s family were in before they moved to Lochfield at Darvel where Sir Alexander was born.

William

Possible Link to Sir Alexander Fleming

Many thanks to William Fleming. The genealogy was worked out by my cousin Vivienne Swaby and her colleague, and we are interested in establishing an accurate link to Sir Alexander Fleming. I have always greatly admired Fleming’s work on penicillin.

Myron Evans

Dr. M. W. Evans, Gent., Civil List Pensioner, D. Sc., Ph.D., B. Sc. (Wales)
www.aias.us

In a message dated 03/02/2016 20:53:35 GMT Standard Time, writes:

ANCESTRY OF SIR ALEXANDER FLEMING

I am not sure if I am contacting the correct person, but this was the only email address that I have found on the website by Dr Myron Evans. I would just like to clarify a few points regarding the family tree of Sir Alexander Fleming and his connection to the Flemings in Hawkwood. The family tree that I have differs from the one on the website. I just wanted to discuss it as what I have may not be correct, although a lot of it has come from members of the Hawkwood family.
I note that you have Sir Alexander as a descendant of John Fleming in Hawkwood, born in 1749. I have a family tree for the Hawkwood Flemings. I was wondering where you gathered the information about this John Fleming being a grandson of Walter Fleming and Christian Somerville. I was under the impression that this John Fleming was a son of John Fleming and Jean Leiper. The four generations before that were Robert, Robert, William and John, with the last named being recorded in Hawkwood when he died in 1652.

I have often tried to link Sir Alexander Fleming’s family to the Hawkwood family, but have as yet not found any proof. I do think that there may be a link but if there is then it was from much earlier than the John born in 1749.

The Walter Fleming that appears on the family tree on the website I would say was from a completely different family. The names of Walter, Thomas and George never featured in the Hawkwood family.

Being a Fleming myself I am very keen to make sure that I have my information correct and I would be interested to know your sources for linking John Fleming in Hawkwood with the family of Walter Fleming. I have always believed that the Hawkwood family were most probably descended from either the Robert Fleming recorded in Strathaven in the 12th century or the William Fleming recorded in Stonehouse at a similar time. The four predominant names in the Hawkwood family were Robert, William, John and James. There were so many Flemings related to the Hawkwood family in the 17th century in Avondale parish that I feel that the family had been in the area for a long time. Walter Fleming came from a family whose origins were not in Avondale.

I will keep an open mind on this, and if I can find proof that I am wrong then I will change the family tree.

Although I am a Fleming, I am from a different family from both Hawkwood and Sir Alexander, but I gather information on all the Fleming families in the parishes of Avondale, Stonehouse, Glassford, East Kilbride and Dalserf, which was the main area of the Flemings in Lanarkshire. There were a great number of different Fleming families and over the years I have been trying to link as many of them as possible. In the 17th century Fleming was the commonest name in the parish of Avondale. I also know quite a few members of the Hawkwood family, and because of that I am very keen that the family tree drawn up for them is correct.

William Fleming

UFT339 Permanently Archived

February 7, 2016

As can be seen from using www.aias.us in www.archive.org, UFT339 is permanently archived in the Wayback Machine.

Discussion of UFT339

February 7, 2016

Many thanks again, and to co author Horst Eckardt for some important ideas.

Another great paper and advance Myron. Congratulations!!

Sent from my Samsung device

Daily Report 5/2/16

February 7, 2016

The equivalent of 256,743 printed pages was downloaded during the day (936.087 megabytes) from 4673 memory files downloaded (hits) and 536 distinct visits each averaging 7.8 memory pages and 14 minutes, printed page to hits ratio of 54.94, main spiders cnsat(China), google, MSN, yandex and yahoo. Collected ECE2 475, top ten items 394, Collected scientometrics 123, Barddoniaeth / Collected poetry 120, Principles of ECE 118, F3(Sp) 73, Autobiography volumes one and two 71, Eckardt / Lindstrom papers 67, Proofs that no torsion means no gravitation 58, Evans / Morris papers 50(est); Engineering Model 31, UFT88 29, UFT311 22, Evans Equations 21, CEFE 19, UFT321 15, Llais 14, Lindstrom Idaho Lecture 11, Most prolific authors 7, Three world records by MWE 7, UFT313 16, UFT314 13, UFT315 13, UFT316 19, UFT317 15(est), UFT318 19, UFT319 21, UFT320 16, UFT322 14, UFT323 13, UFT324 18, UFT325 23, UFT326 16, UFT327 15, UFT328 48, UFT329 17, UFT330 16, UFT331 15, UFT332 18, UFT333 19, UFT334 24, UFT335 21, UFT336 24, UFT337 18, UFT338 24 to date in February 2016. University of Innsbruck Levitron; National University of Colombia UFT166; Michigan State University UFT175; University of Washington general; University of Wales Cardiff overview. Intense interest all sectors, updated usage file attached for February 2016.

Many thanks to William Fleming

February 6, 2016

Many thanks again, I recall that Vivienne sent a message some time ago on the reasoning that led to a possible link with Sir Alexander. This is impressively researched information, and so is the work of Vivienne and her colleague. I should think that more and more material will be archived on the internet soon, so a clue may come up.

Myron

In a message dated 04/02/2016 16:43:50 GMT Standard Time writes:

Looking at the family tree for Sir Alexander Fleming, and regarding his great grandparents, John Fleming and Janet Fleming, they were married in 1768 and their eight known children were James (b.1769), Mary (b.1771), Hugh (b.1773), James (b.1775), John (b.1778), Andrew (b.1780), William (b.1782) and Matthew (b/1784). If John was a grandson of Walter Fleming and Christian Somerville then I would have thought that one of the sons (usually the eldest) would have been named Walter. As John and Janet had only one daughter it is difficult to know if a second daughter would have been named Christian. but in all the succeeding generations no daughter was ever named Christian.
When William Fleming in Plewland died about 1589 there was a hint that he may have originated from Tweeddale in Peeblesshire where a Fleming family had lived from an early period. I have never been able to prove this. The names of Robert, Alexander, John and William all featured in that family which made me think that there really might be a connection there. That family had connections to the nobility Fleming family who originally settled in Lanarkshire and built Boghall Castle at Biggar, the seat of the family for a lengthy time.

The connection with the Peeblesshire Flemings should not be taken as gospel, but it is something that I have often tried to find more evidence for.

If only more records were available it would make the job much easier.

William

Possible Link to Sir Alexander Fleming

Many thanks again! I attach the Comb / Newlands line and line of Sir Alexander Fleming with which you are familiar. These were prepared by Vivienne Swaby and her colleague. I think that a link proven by documents must be established between Christiana Fleming (born 1740 in Blackburn), who married David Comb (born 1729 in Dunbar), and any one of the Flemings of the line of Sir Alexander Fleming. Also attached is the extrapolation of the line of Patrick Comb to Thomaidh Mor, descended from Clan Mac an Taoiseach. Looking for accurate Fleming ancestry must be like looking for accurate Evans ancestry here in Wales.

In a message dated 04/02/2016 09:43:19 GMT Standard Time, writes:

Dear Myron,
Thank you for your reply. The family tree on the website for Sir Alexander Fleming back to John Fleming and his spouse Janet Fleming who were married in 1768 is in total agreement with the tree that I have. However it is the lineage before that where we differ. I believe that the aforementioned John possibly came from the branch of the family who farmed in Glengavel, a neighbouring farm to Plewland and Martinholm. The family names of the Glengavel family were Hugh, John, Andrew, William and Alexander and most of those names were prominent in Sir Alexander’s family. I also found a record of a William Fleming who died in Plewland about 1589. Plewland was the farm that Sir Alexander’s family were in before they moved to Lochfield at Darvel where Sir Alexander was born.

William

Possible Link to Sir Alexander Fleming

Many thanks to William Fleming. The genealogy was worked out by my cousin Vivienne Swaby and her colleague, and we are interested in establishing an accurate link to Sir Alexander Fleming. I have always greatly admired Fleming’s work on penicillin.

Myron Evans

Dr. M. W. Evans, Gent., Civil List Pensioner, D. Sc., Ph.D., B. Sc. (Wales)
www.aias.us

In a message dated 03/02/2016 20:53:35 GMT Standard Time, writes:

ANCESTRY OF SIR ALEXANDER FLEMING

I am not sure if I am contacting the correct person, but this was the only email address that I have found on the website by Dr Myron Evans. I would just like to clarify a few points regarding the family tree of Sir Alexander Fleming and his connection to the Flemings in Hawkwood. The family tree that I have differs from the one on the website. I just wanted to discuss it as what I have may not be correct, although a lot of it has come from members of the Hawkwood family.
I note that you have Sir Alexander as a descendant of John Fleming in Hawkwood, born in 1749. I have a family tree for the Hawkwood Flemings. I was wondering where you gathered the information about this John Fleming being a grandson of Walter Fleming and Christian Somerville. I was under the impression that this John Fleming was a son of John Fleming and Jean Leiper. The four generations before that were Robert, Robert, William and John, with the last named being recorded in Hawkwood when he died in 1652.

I have often tried to link Sir Alexander Fleming’s family to the Hawkwood family, but have as yet not found any proof. I do think that there may be a link but if there is then it was from much earlier than the John born in 1749.

The Walter Fleming that appears on the family tree on the website I would say was from a completely different family. The names of Walter, Thomas and George never featured in the Hawkwood family.

Being a Fleming myself I am very keen to make sure that I have my information correct and I would be interested to know your sources for linking John Fleming in Hawkwood with the family of Walter Fleming. I have always believed that the Hawkwood family were most probably descended from either the Robert Fleming recorded in Strathaven in the 12th century or the William Fleming recorded in Stonehouse at a similar time. The four predominant names in the Hawkwood family were Robert, William, John and James. There were so many Flemings related to the Hawkwood family in the 17th century in Avondale parish that I feel that the family had been in the area for a long time. Walter Fleming came from a family whose origins were not in Avondale.

I will keep an open mind on this, and if I can find proof that I am wrong then I will change the family tree.

Although I am a Fleming, I am from a different family from both Hawkwood and Sir Alexander, but I gather information on all the Fleming families in the parishes of Avondale, Stonehouse, Glassford, East Kilbride and Dalserf, which was the main area of the Flemings in Lanarkshire. There were a great number of different Fleming families and over the years I have been trying to link as many of them as possible. In the 17th century Fleming was the commonest name in the parish of Avondale. I also know quite a few members of the Hawkwood family, and because of that I am very keen that the family tree drawn up for them is correct.

William Fleming

FOR POSTING: UFT339 and Background Notes

February 6, 2016

This is UFT339 and background notes, on the development of the dynamics of vacuum particles, reinterpretation of the Hubble constant, Compton scattering processes and the synthesis of matter particles from the interaction of vacuum particles.

a339thpaper.pdf

a339thpapernotes1.pdf

a339thpapernotes2.pdf

a339thpapernotes3.pdf

a339thpapernotes4.pdf

a339thpapernotes5.pdf

a339thpapernotes6.pdf

a339thpapernotes7.pdf

Discussion of 339(7)

February 6, 2016

Agreed with this, initially the theory should be kept as simple as possible, as always in physics, so UFT339 will deal with the initial stages of Compton type scattering of vacuum and matter particles. UFT338 reported a precise result, the existence and precise mass and velocity of the vacuum particle, so the idea is to build on UFT338 with the minimum of speculation, if possible no speculation at all. At present it is known experimentally that electron positron pairs are produced by the vacuum, so the first idea is to assume that these are produced by collision and transmutation of two vacuum particles. Propulsion by the vacuum is produced by the collision of a vacuum particle with a matter particle such as an electron. Initially Compton type theory is used. This will evolve into a new theory of the Casimir effect.

To: EMyrone@aol.com
Sent: 05/02/2016 15:36:10 GMT Standard Time
Subj: Re: 339(7): Summary of Vacuum Particle Collision Processes

The probablility for existance of vacuum-antipartiles is quite low because annihilation would occur immediately, but this is similar to electron-positron pairs. They can exist but will be annihilated after a short time.

Horst

Am 05.02.2016 um 13:00 schrieb EMyrone:

This is a short summary of the myriad of processes involving the newly discovered vacuum particle. It is assumed in this note that there is also a vacuum antiparticle, so the evolution of the universe is due fundamentally to the annihilation of vacuum particles and vacuum antparticles to give pairs of elementary particles and antiparticles. These evolve into stars, galaxies and planets. The reverse process involves annihilation of particles and antiparticles to give pairs of vacuum particles and antiparticles. The universe has no beginning and no end, these processes evolve infinitely.

Discussion of 339(7)

February 6, 2016

Many thanks, I will start to write up UFT339 today along these lines, the vacuum is as richly structured as material matter so the equations of material matter can be adopted for the vacuum, as long as the theory is checked at every stage against experimental data.

To: EMyrone@aol.com
Sent: 05/02/2016 12:57:41 GMT Standard Time
Subj: Re: 339(7): Summary of Vacuum Particle Collision Processes

Fantastic. Much better than invisible and never to be detected dark matter! No beginning and no end, no big bang and no all consuming black holes.

This has really stirred things up!

Sent from my Samsung device


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