I agree with the criticism by David Starkey of Fitzwilliam College Cambridge

David Starkey is a historian who has criticized the culture of looking for foreign students to milk with fees for diluted degrees. The net result in Wales is that small Colleges are flooded with mediocre students who have a corrupting effect on the local culture and language. The idea of the sixties reforms was to allow working class students to attend university if they were good enough. Their fees were paid by local Councils, and they received a small grant. Even then the entrance requirement for Aberystwyth was the minimum, two D’s. I had A, B, B, D (a self taught certificate in pure mathematics, the school did not teach it). That was good enough for Cambridge but I never had any intention of turning my back on my own language and country. The headmaster Silwyn Lewis got enraged at me and literally threw me out of his office, resulting in an inelastic collision with the Latin mistress, Maude Daniel. The latter knifed the headmaster with a glare, all four foot ten of her. By the time I arrived at Aberystwyth in the autumn of 1968 (Autobiography volumes one and two) the place had already been heavily anglicised. This was a profound shock to me, I expected a fully Welsh speaking College and resented what to me was and is a betrayal of the intention of the Founders at the National Eisteddfod of 1893 – a University in and for Wales. Since then the entrance requirements seem to have been lowered and fees deliberately inflated. There is no reason for these fees, as the sixties system shows. There must be an effort throughout Wales to stop the colonizing activities of the University. My preference is to close it down for a few years for retraining in the Welsh language. I have competed fairly for everything all my life, so I deeply resent cronyism of all kinds. As Starkey points out, it destroys meritocracy, and will destroy the British reputation for academic excellence. It has already destroyed the University of Wales.


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