Discussion of 379(2)

Many thanks. This illustrates the simplest kind of resonance method, it may be easier to develop UFT318 and UFT319 using antiymmetry, then tune the spin connection so that g becomes positive.

To: EMyrone@aol.com
Sent: 05/06/2017 11:17:42 GMT Daylight Time
Subj: Re: 379(2): A Simple Resonant Counter Gravitational Device and Graviton Mass

I could not decipher the denomination of m_g. Should it be a graviton?
At the earth surface, r is about 6000 km, and there is practically no variation of Phi(r) in a range relevant for devices (< 1 m). Therefore we have in a very good approximation:

Phi(r) = const
and
del^2 Phi = 0.

Therefore eq.(13) is no more an equation for an Euler-Bernoulli resonance. This may be reflected in the extremely low resonance frequency (28) which is completely out of technical scope.

Horst

Am 02.06.2017 um 13:46 schrieb EMyrone:

This note uses simple Euler Bernoulli resonance to show that the resonance condition (21) produces an infinitely positive gravitational potential, Eq. (22), so this overcomes the negative gravitational potential of the earth, producing counter gravitation at resonance. In the limit (26) of the ECE gravitational wave equation the electromagnetic frequency needed to produce counter gravitation can be calculated in terms of teh graviton mass as in Eq. (27). Resonant counter gravitation would be a method of measuring the graviton mass. IN recent papers such as Haranas et l. (2014), the graviton mass is estimated to be 1.91 ten power minus 61 kilograms, so the electromagnetic frequency needed for counter gravitation is 1.62 ten power minus ten radians per second, an ultra low frequency field. This is a simple first theory that can be refined by refining the condition (23) using the tetrad postulate of Cartan geometry. The ECE wave equation is derived directly from the tetrad postulate, together will all the wave equations of physics, classical and quantum. The same resonance method could be used to measure the photon mass. At present the graviton mass is unknown experimentally. In the now obsolete standard model it was thought to be zero because the range of the gravitational field was thought to be infinite.


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